Water Therapy Exercises

The techniques used in water therapy exercise for back pain include spa therapy, standing or floating pool exercises, swimming, and conditioning using specialized equipment, such as surgical tubing, flotation devices, and resistive devices for the hands or feet. .Active water therapy exercises for back pain are diverse and should be tailored to the individual and his or her specific condition. Exercises range from simple routines performed in a shallow pool to conditioning using underwater treadmills and other high-tech equipment. Pool Therapy Exercise Techniques Some of the basic techniques for pool therapy exercises are as follows (they can be modified for varying degrees…

Weight Loss Tips: Here Are 12 Actually Backed By Science

Losing weight is hard. You’ve encountered more diets than you can count but none of them have effectively battled the bulge you’re carrying. You know what works? Habits proven by science. Keep these 12 tips in mind to give your weight loss efforts a boost: 1. Drink water before meals. The popular understanding here is that drinking water will fill you up, causing you to eat less and reducing your overall calorie intake to encourage weight loss. However, a study has shown that instead of simply making you feel full, drinking water actually helps reduce the number of calories the body…

Body Weight and Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic condition of the synovial joint. The disease develops over time and most commonly affects the knees, hips and hands, and less commonly the shoulder, spine, ankles, and feet. It’s a prevalent, disabling disease, and consequently has a formidable individual and social impact. Approximately 10-12% of the adult population have symptomatic OA, and knee OA alone is considered more responsible for increasing the risk of mobility disability (requiring help to walk or climb stairs) than any other medical condition in people aged 65 and over. Osteoarthritis reduces the quality and quantity of life. By using Quality adjusted…

Beat ‘Tech Neck’: Repair Droopy Neck Skin Caused by Your Devices

The sun, poor diet and stress can all wreak havoc on skin, but your tech can, too. The phenomenon is known as “tech neck,” a phrase that describes how people’s electronic devices could be causing the skin on their necks to sag. The constant attention people pay to their cellphones and laptops and tablets does come with consequences, Dr. Harold Lancer, a dermatologist in Beverly Hills, said. “Anything that’s electronic captures your attention and you have to bend your neck, you’re just ruining the neck muscles,” Lancer told “Good Morning America.” Lancer likened the neck muscles to the wires in a suspension…

Got Back Pain? You Might Be Part Chimp

People with lower back problems are more likely to have a spine similar in shape to the chimpanzee, our closest ape relatives. A lesion which forms in the disc between the bones of the spine is the reason for the differing shape. It would have caused the vertebrae to change as humans evolved from using four legs to two legs. The researchers say their findings could help doctors predict who may be at risk of back problems. The study, published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, involved scientists from Scotland, Canada and Iceland. The research team analysed the vertebrae of chimpanzees, orangutans and…

A Healthy Weight for a Healthy Back

Experts agree that the best way to achieve and maintain a healthy weight level is through a balanced diet and exercise. For people with many types of back problems, regular exercise and, when necessary, weight loss, can help ease existing back problems and prevent future ones. Obesity and Extra Weight Can Cause Low Back Pain Along with other health issues that arise from having an unhealthy weight level, obese and overweight patients have an increased risk for back pain, joint pain and muscle strain. In particular, overweight patients are more likely to experience problems in their low back than patients at…

The Truth About Dry Brushing and What It Does for You

There are a variety of health claims about dry brushing. For those who aren’t familiar with the technique, it involves daily body massage with a dry, stiff-bristled brush. It’s been said to help flaky winter skin, increase circulation, detoxify, help digestion – and even improve the appearance of cellulite. But are these claims true? Some, but definitely not all. Below, find some questions patients often ask about dry brushing: 1. What are the real health benefits of dry brushing? The mechanical action of dry brushing is wonderful for exfoliating dry winter skin. It also helps detoxify by increasing blood circulation and promoting…

How to Keep Sore Hips, Knees, Shoulders from Ruining Your Sleep

If you roll out of bed bleary-eyed each day, thinking, “Oh, my aching ,” you’re not alone. Research shows that between 50 and 90 percent of people with chronic joint pain don’t sleep well. And, that sleep deprivation can lead to other health issues, including low energy, mood disorders and eating problems. If you have chronic pain in your hips, knees or shoulders, there are things you can do to limit how much the discomfort affects your nighttime rest, says Michael Schaefer, MD, Director of Musculoskeletal Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Cleveland Clinic. “A healthy brain is a well-rested…

Why Hugging Is Actually Good for Your Health

Turns out, hugs don’t just make you feel good. It might sound a little corny or just something fun to do, but researchers find that giving people an affectionate squeeze is actually good for your health. “The health benefits of giving and receiving hugs are quite impressive. They have a therapeutic effect on people,” says psychologist Joe Rock, PsyD.   He says research has found that hugs: Decrease release of cortisol, a stress hormone — University of Miami researchers have published numerous studies backing the benefits of the human touch. They found it can do things…

Is Chlorine in Indoor Swimming Pools Hard on Your Lungs?

In winter or on a rainy day, an indoor pool can be just the way to get moving and to get your heart pumping. However, common chemicals in pool water that can get more concentrated indoors may make it harder on your lungs. “The main concern with indoor pools is the chlorine, which is used as a disinfecting agent,” according to pulmonologist Rachel Taliercio, DO. While it’s important to keep harmful bacteria under control, it can be potentially irritating, she says. Swimming in indoor pools can expose you to higher levels of chlorine in the air and increase your risk for…